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  • Safetell at Data Centre World 2019

    21 Jan 2019 Safetell Ltd
    Safetell Ltd is a designer, manufacturer, installer and service provider for a wide range of security products for corporate clients nationwide. We provide very specialist security products that allow ...
  • EkkoSense, the data centre M&E Capacity Planning and Simulation specialist, has launched a major partner recruitment drive to help accelerate its expansion plans – both in the UK and internationally.​

  • Chatsworth Products' (CPI) newly redesigned CUBE-iT™Wall-Mount Floor-Supported Cabinet is now available for purchase. It secures and protects large information and communications technology (ICT) and audiovisual equipment, while enabling valuable space savings.

    The three-part, swing-out design delivers exceptional strength and rigidity, and includes two heights and depths to support a variety of larger server-converged equipment, heavy-duty UPSs, batteries and Power over Ethernet (PoE) deployments.

  • How an atmosphere of excellence elevated Hanley Energy to the world stage

    11 Jan 2019 Clive Gilmore, CEO of Hanley Energy

    Press editorial: Friday, Janurary 11 2019.

    Title: How an atmosphere of excellence elevated Hanley Energy to the world stage

    Author: Clive Gilmore, CEO of Hanley Energy - North Virginia USA.

  • A typical UPS lifetime is generally around ten years, as manufacturers are obliged to supply replacement parts for up to ten years after cessation of manufacture. Therefore, the purchasing of equipment five years before this end date may extend the product’s apparent life to 14 years – after which, capacitors and/or batteries usually require replacing for a second or third time thereby making further investment in aging technology prohibitive.

     

    Surprisingly, replacement batteries can cost 30 to 40% of a brand-new UPS system. The standard five or ten-year design life VRLA type battery will generally require replacing at four or eight years.

     

    Replacing individual faulty battery blocks in strings is not recommended due to the different impedances between old and new and equalisation becomes a problem. Rapid chemical build-up within the new blocks will seriously affect their performance and within weeks they can become significantly ‘aged’; best practice is to replace all batteries at the same time.

     

    Replacement of capacitors, AC and DC, is also a costly exercise and although prices vary depending on the UPS system, can amount to around 5-10% of the cost of a new UPS. Recommended replacement times vary between manufacturer with some advocating changing both at five years. Confirm this with your UPS supplier!

     

    For the reasons above, if your UPS is approaching a point where both batteries and capacitors need replacing, it is worth considering the potential commercial advantages of replacement versus repair. A new system will have a 2-year warranty, advances in technology mean it will be more efficient, making significant savings on running costs on both electricity and reduced cooling requirements.

     

    Over time, your load profile will undoubtedly have changed so it is worth investigating Modular UPS systems which can be right-sized more easily to your actual load: why pay for a large UPS when you don’t need it!? The Modular option can therefore reduce CAPEX as well as OPEX. In addition, the latest generation of Modular systems offer the highest availability and continuity of critical power delivery. For example: CENTIEL’s 4th generation modular UPS CumulusPower has 99.9999999% availability.

     

    In some situations, a brand-new system could offer a far better technical solution at a similar cost to replacement parts. For a mid-range UPS system, say 60 to 200KVA, the remedial battery works may cost around £5-15K plus the cost of the capacitors. Suddenly, the cost of a similar sized replacement becomes attractive. Plus, a new UPS will come with that warranty and lower running costs.

     

    However, often in business, OPEX and CAPEX lie in different cost centres. It might be easier to push through a purchase order for replacement batteries than invest in a new UPS which would offer long-term savings on running costs and provide higher availability. Here a total cost of ownership (TCO) calculation is helpful to assess the savings over the long term following a capital investment.

     

    For example, a legacy 200kVA standalone UPS only using 100kVA of power could be replaced with a 200-kVA frame with two x 50KVA Modules. This right-sizing using UPS modules reduces CAPEX and lowers ongoing maintenance costs too.

     

    In a recent TCO calculation: the energy saved by replacing an oversized, inefficient, UPS paid for a new Modular system within three years! The calculated savings over ten years made the decision a ‘no-brainer’.

     

    Advances in UPS technology can also reduce the cost of future replacement parts. Legacy UPS systems have capacitors soldered on to pcb’s, where in contrast, the latest modular UPSs facilitate simple swapping capability via components mounted on screw in sub-assemblies. CENTIEL has designed CumulusPower so the DC capacitors only require replacement every ten years and AC capacitors every five-six years so can be changed separately to save costs.

     

    When considering this repair/replacement conundrum, consider also how your business may change in the future. Will it grow? Will it always run at its current capacity? A new, truly modular configuration offers “pay as you grow” flexibility. Right-sizing the system initially, minimises CAPEX, while providing the capability to upgrade your system’s capacity with additional Modules.

     

    CENTIEL work at the forefront of UPS technological development and are trusted advisors to some of the world’s leading institutions in this field. For more information about our 4th generation truly modular UPS CumulusPower please see: www.centiel.co.uk

     

  • Duct Sealing & What is Fire Stopping

    09 Jan 2019 Carl Pike

    WHAT IS FIRE STOPPING?

    Fire stopping definition is the sealing of any openings to prevent a fire. The primary goal of fire stopping is to prevent both smoke and heat from passing through gaps

     

  • Over the past 15 years Duct Sealing has become an important factor when designing and constructing new buildings; however, it remains both a task and a product that a lot of companies overlook and underestimate the time required to effectively seal ducts.

     

  • EkkoSense has identified the five data centre optimisation trends that it believes will make a real difference for organisations in 2019.​

     

  • Maximum reliability and availability for your data centre infrastructures.

  • Borri unveils the new UPSaver 3vo.

    08 Jan 2019 Borri S.p.A.

    Higher power 333 kW modules to provide scalability up to 21 MW.

  • Blocking bypass airflow through cabinets is a critical component of any effective airflow management solution, and may temporarily solve cooling issues without the need for additional ducted exhausts or aisle containment. 

     

  • Perfect load balancing in PDUs

    20 Dec 2018 SCHURTER

    In addition to 1-phase systems, 3-phase systems are also used in many places in industry and commerce. They often offer decisive advantages. It is important to ensure safe load balancing in order to prevent overloads.

  • Compatible in the transition phase

    20 Dec 2018 SCHURTER

    DC connectors according to IEC TS 62735 are (still) new territory. Tailored for the time being to a very specific clientele and demanding due to the new technology, they pave the way for a future-oriented, efficient power supply with enormous potential for various fields of application.

  • Light pipes for status display

    20 Dec 2018 SCHURTER

    SCHURTER improves upon a classic product: the new 6600-5 series IEC outlets are available with integrated light pipes. An intelligent, space and cost-saving solution for PDUs used in data centers and other multi-distributed power applications.

  • 400 VDC for Data Centers

    20 Dec 2018 SCHURTER

    Converting, transforming, converting, transforming – vast amounts of unused electricity simply disappear in data centers. The idea of switching the power supply to direct current and bypassing a large proportion of these losses results in a paradigm shift.

  • Author: Alex Boudry, General Manager of PFS Fueltec, specialist suppliers of diesel equipment for backup generators at mission critical sites.

    Alex has 15 years’ of experience in fuel equipment supply to the downstream petrol and diesel sector.

  • The lead-acid battery systems used to power UPS systems have been proven over many years.  The Valve Regulated Lead Acid (VRLA) blocks we used three decades ago are the same as those used today!  However, in the next few years, Lithium ion (Li0ion) is set to revolutionise how we back-up our power protection systems.  How fast the take up will be, will depend on how rapidly prices reduce to loevels that make the investment in Li-ion a practical alternative.

    Prices are being driving down by the automotive industry and have reduced ten-fold over the past ten years.  Perceptions are also changing.  In the past, there has been some reticence about small Li-ion applications, however, now with the inclusion of battery monitoring systems they are now regarded as a safe and viable option and are in use in a variety of industries.  It is only a matter of time before Li-ion becomes mainstream within datacentres across the world.

    Increasingly we are being asked to provide comparative quotes for Lead Acid versus Li-ion batteries for UPS installations.  Depending on the customer’s project, we are generally finding the initial cost of buying Li-ion compared with Lead Acid batteries works out at around 2.5 times more expensive.  When prices can be reduced to around 1.8 to twice the initial purchase price of Lead Acid, we believe the various benefits and considerations relating to total cost of ownership (TCO) will start outweighing concerns about the initial investment.

    One of the main benefits of Li-ion is length of life.   Lead Acid batteries last around ten years but are normally replaced every seven or eight years.  Li-ion lasts twice that and has a built-in battery monitoring system which regulates the charge and measures impedance in real-time.  If a fault occurs, the battery monitoring system alerts your UPS maintenance provider, raising awareness of an issue before the block fails.  With Lead Acid you only know there is a battery problem when you need to use it and if it doesn’t work then it’s too late!

    As well as lasting much longer, Li-ion batteries require less than half the physical space of the equivalent Lead Acid blocks and are less than 25% of the weight.  Commonly, above ground-floor installations can require structural strengthening of the building simply to house the required Lead Acid batteries.  Logistically, moving many tonnes of equipment in and out of an upstairs comms room, when batteries need replacing, can also present challenges.  For data-centres looking to increase their power density within the same foot print Li-ion promises a practical solution.

    Switching to Li-ion could also improve the overall efficiency of the comms room.  This is because a further advantage of Li-ion is that it can work at a higher temperature, therefore requiring less-expensive cooling, reducing the amount of overall energy consumed.  Most IT systems work better at >25 oC and the UPS technology itself can work well up to 40 oC.   By contrast: an industry standard estimate is that for every 10 degrees above 20 oC the operating life of a VRLA battery is halved.   With growing concerns about reducing the carbon footprints of datacentres, being able to decrease or even remove the electricity requirement for cooling could become an increasingly attractive and important consideration.

     

     

    However, the up-take and roll-out of Li-ion across the datacentre industry will not happen overnight.  Not all systems are Li-ion ready, but they need to be.  Manufacturers of UPS equipment need to ensure their technology is compatible and can ‘talk’ to the Li-ion battery monitoring system.  Currently CENTIEL and only a handful of other manufactures offer Li-ion ready UPS.

    In addition, understandably, the critical power protection industry tends to be particularly risk averse.  The early adopters will be the sector’s innovators.  Then how rapidly we see Li-ion in mainstream will likely depend on the experience of these first small installations.

    Interestingly, the adoption of Li-ion within UPS systems so far has been greater in developing countries in Africa and the Middle East, where the main power grid is less reliable than in the UK and frequent power problems are more commonplace.  In these instances, the UPS and battery systems are required to be cycled several times per day.  This greater adoption is primarily due to the higher cycling life of Li-ion: typically, 2,500 power-up and down cycles compared with around 300 for VRLA technology.

     

     

    Over time we believe, there will be an inevitable shift towards Lithium ion batteries as cost reductions, driven by developments in the automotive industry, flow through to the standby power sectors.  Incorporating Li-ion will inevitably reduce the size and weight of UPS systems overall and the longer useful working life of Li-ion will mean fewer costly replacements.  All of which will benefit customers with reductions in both CAPEX and OPEX and make Li-ion batteries a winning solution for UPS applications requiring compact, innovative protection.

    For further information about CENTIEL UK Ltd please come and talk to us at Data Centre World 2010 on booth:  D1035.

     

    This artile was origonally feature in Electrical Engineering Magazine

  • What is your definition of a Modular UPS? A question that, surprisingly, has several answers!  We have all become aquainted with those lovely ‘buzz’ words that are associated with modular systems, words like: flexibilty, availability, scalability, right-sizing, pay-as-you-grow and hot-swap.. etc..etc.  However, the term modular itself can mean different things to different people so it is important to check the nature of what is being described as a ‘modular system’ carefully when buying a UPS solution to ensure the essential power of your datacentre is protected at all times. 

    A single standalone UPS unit that protects a critical load is known as an N system configuration. This is all very well but lacks any resilience in the event that the UPS unit develops a fault or is offline for preventative maintenance. Simply paralleling a second standalone UPS unit of the same rating gives us that resilience and is known as an N+1 configuration.  Of course, you can parallel several standalone units together of an individual smaller rating to give the same philospohy, for example if we took this to the extreme we could have 101 x 1KVA UPS units in parallel which would still offer 100KVA N+1 configuration. Obviously this wouldn’t be practical but you get the picture.   By using this philosophy it could be described – at the most simple level – as a modular UPS system.   However, there does need to be the associated electrical infrastructure –switchgear etc – to be able to add more standalone units.  

    Another definition of modular is a standalone UPS designed and manufactured in a modular format.  The main component parts of rectifier, inverter and static switch are modular. This means if there is a problem with say the recitifier it can be swapped easily.  However, if one componentt does fail the whole UPS functionality goes down with it.  It may be a modular system but its level of availability will not be reliable.

    A better solution is what we term:  a true modular UPS.  This is where several individual UPS modules are contained within a frame.  All the individual modules are UPS’s in their own right, all containing a recifier, inverter and static switch and all operating online in parallel with each other. For example five 60kW UPS modules may typically be contained within a single frame offering a resilient configuration of 240KWs N+1.  If required, it takes moments (around 30 seconds) to ‘hot-swap’ a module while the rest of the modules continue to protect the critIcal load. At no point does the system need to be transferred to maintenance bypass and hence on raw mains.

    Some other modular systems include the rectifier and inverter within their modules but the static switch is centralised and separate.  This offers a potential single point of failure.   It may only take a few moments to replace a separate static switch, but, depending on location, getting to the site to replace it may take a maintenance engineer several hours.  During that time the system cannot transfer to static bypass.   With a true modular system, where the static switch is included in each module, the rest of the modules in the UPS frame continue to protect the load until it can be replaced.  This increases the level of availablity dramatically.

    Naturally, often cost comes into the decision making process when purchasing a UPS.  However, the purpose of a UPS system must be to protect essential power with the highest level of availability.   There must be no potential single points of failure.  Therefore, it is important to check the configuration and the definition of a modular system carefully before purchasing.

    At CENTIEL our design team has been working with data centres for many years at the forefront of technological development. We are the trusted advisors to some of the world’s leading institutions in this field.  For this reason, we have developed our pioneering 4th generation true modular UPS system CumulusPower which offers offer industry-leading availability of 99.9999999% (nine, nines), with low total cost of ownership (TCO) through its Maximum Efficiency Management (MEM) and low losses of energy.  

    This article was featured in DCM Magazine December 2018

  • When trying to decide on the best data center design and the most appropriate products, it is not always about the latest trend. What is right for one data center may not be right for another. It is important to understand the different options available in terms of server cabinets and racks, and the different advantages they can bring.

  • The pace of deployment for storage continues to increase, while the refresh cycle for compute continues to shorten. How will you support rapid deployment so that racks, power and network are in place when compute and storage is required? 

  • Vertiv Identifies Top Five 2019 Data Centre Trends: Edge Will Drive Change

    04 Dec 2018 Giordano Albertazzi, president for Vertiv in Europe, Middle East and Africa

    The edge of the network continues to be the epicentre of innovation in the data centre space as the calendar turns to 2019. 

  • Hydro66, founded in 2014 is a pioneering, ultra-efficient, green-field colocation data center located in Boden, Northern Sweden. A key objective of the company was to design their new Nordic data centre to operate at a power usage effectiveness (PUE) – the ratio of total amount of energy used by a data centre to the energy delivered to computing equipment – of less than 1.05. This could only be achieved using fresh-air cooling (EcoCooling ECT10800 Nordic Cooling range) supported by the most efficient uninterruptible power supply (UPS) and power distribution.

    Hydro66 decided to use a direct ventilation system supplemented by evaporative cooling (EcoCooling ECT10800 Nordic Cooling range). The equipment is modular and installed internally, thereby avoiding planning issues. Electronically commutated (EC) axial fans are used for air movement. With very low pressures, axials can also accommodate the larger flow rates and pressure, and their motors are efficient, quiet and have simple speed controls. The efficiency of a fan is approximately proportional to the cube of the speed. Data centres require redundancy of N+1, 2N or 2(N+1), so equipment is operated at part capacity.

    By controlling all of the EC fans as a group – and reducing the air flow rate to that required by the IT equipment reductions in consumer fan power can be achieved, producing remarkable efficiencies. On average, 1MW of IT equipment will require an airflow of 90m³/s of air at compliant temperatures. Since the data centre has both redundancy and spare capacity, the ventilation rate is reduced and further savings are made. For example, running a fan at 80% reduces energy use by half and, at 50%, to 12.5%. An intelligent control system is used by Hydro66 constantly to optimise the fan energy use to reflect actual cooling requirements in a dynamic environment. On warmer days, the adiabatic cooling is enabled, bringing the supply air down to approach the wet-bulb temperature of the ambient air. In Boden, this means the supply air will never exceed 22C, which is compliant with all standards without the need to use additional mechanical refrigeration.

     

    Hydro66 had a very clear vision on how we could bring a new model to colocation – one where the customer wins significantly on both cost and on sustainability. We were fortunate to discover EcoCooling who were able to exceed our expectations. Not only in terms of pure efficiency of their equipment, but more importantly their desire and capability to enhance their solutions to our specific use case.

    ALEX CHIOLO, HYDRO66 OPERATIONS DIRECTOR

     

    The use of adiabatic cooling will increase the moisture content, while reducing dry-bulb temperature, so increasing the relative humidity of the air. With reference to the ASHRAE 2011 Thermal Guidelines, high relative humidity (RH) will normally only cause corrosion with other contaminants in the air. If gases such as sulphur or chlorine are in the ambient air, these, plus high RH, can cause corrosion. Boden has ‘clean’ air because there are no local industries producing contaminants.

    The combination of high RH and dust or particulates can also create problems, so all incoming and recirculating air is filtered. In relatively clean conditions such as those in Boden, EU4 is a suitable level of filtration. Increasing this can result in significant increases in capital cost, maintenance requirements and fan energy use. A direct fresh-air system

    A direct fresh-air system operating in arctic conditions at the coldest time of the year can result in very low RH in the data centre. Low RH, in conjunction with other factors, can cause problems with electrostatic discharge (ESD), which can damage IT equipment. EcoCooling specially designed Nordic cooling system incorporates a recirculation loop, where – in low RH conditions – the warm air from the data centre is passed over the adiabatic pads to humidify the air above the ASHRAE 2011 Thermal Guidelines’ allowable level of 20%. This novel solution, therefore, uses the adiabatic pads for two functions – cooling in hot weather and humidification in cold weather conditions.

    Hydro66 has constructed a low capital cost, flexible data centre, which has achieved a PUE of less than 1.05. The direct fresh-air Nordic cooling system complements the Download the data sheet for the ECT10800 internal evaporative cooler with humidification.  More information on data centre cooling

  • A Tale of Two Datacentres

    27 Nov 2018 Article originally featured in DCNN November 2018

    A Tale of Two Datacentres

    27 Nov, 2018 | Articles

    “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness…” Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities.

    With apologies to Charles Dickens.

     

    Reducing Risk

    The datacentre manager is responsible for maintaining their, or their clients’ essential systems and processes 24/7.

    Power delivery is therefore critical and power protection systems must be available every second of every day and so maximizing system availability must be the overriding objective of any installation.

    Availability can be defined as the probability that an item will operate satisfactorily at a given point in time, crucially it includes both preventive and corrective maintenance downtime. It is most often represented as the percentage of system uptime achieved in a year and by the equation of mean time between failure (MTBF) divided by mean time between failure, plus the mean time to repair MTTR. MTBF can be mitigated by overall system design, i.e. removing single points of failure and MTTR by product design. Over the years, many improvements have been made in relation to UPS technology and configurations to increase availability.

    Data centre managers are naturally risk averse people as the consequences of going ‘off line’ even for a few seconds can incure significant financial penalites relating to service level agreements. Down time can result in loss of clients, loss of reputation plus the incalcuable cost of missed revenue of potential cients shopping for a more reliable alternative. A pretty stressful occupation!

    The Human Element

    So why in the age of wisdom, do we still see headlines relating to large data centres power failures? Even if the most advanced technology is employed to create a reslient and highly available UPS system, there is still room for human error and there are many published statistics indicating the percentage of failures caused by such. Of course, problems caused by lack of training is a completely separate issue and no-one can mitigate against wanton mailce. However it still appears that most of the high-profile incidents of data centre power outages have been linked to human intervention – accidental or otherwise.

    Secure access of control rooms limit the chance of outside interference and thorough training and proceedures – including the two man rule – reduce the risk of mistakes being made. Data centre managers put proceedures and training in place to mitigate these risks as far as humanly possible but how can technology help?

    Technology

    From a technological point of view, building redundancy into the UPS system reduces the risk of the system going off-line and increases availablity.

    As data centres have evolved from using a single UPS to parallel systems, availablity has increased. The higher the availability, the lower the downtime. The introduction of redundancy and low MTTR by rapid hot swap modular designs now means with some of the UPSs on the market, six-nines (99.999999%) availability is possible. This equates to some 32 seconds downtime over a year, a relatively small value in time but to a data centre it is an eternity. So how can we increase this availabilty percentage even higher?

    Distributed Active Reduntant Architecture

    Following extensive failure analysis research and insights gathered from 25 years’ of field experience working with a large number of data centers and other critical environments, CENTIEL’s power protection solutions are reaching 9 Nines levels of availability, reducing downtime risk and avoiding costly errors.

    Distributed Active Reduntant Architecture (DARA) is a concept introduced by CENTIEL into its 4th generation UPS. This active-redundant technology alongside the elimination of potential single points of failure and the true modular hot swap capability allows CENTIEL’s CumulusPower™ to deliver an industry leading availability of 9 nines (99.999999999) to fulfill the needs of the most critical power applications. Cumuluspower takes downtime from seconds, to the milliseconds level.

    A Tale of Two Data Centres

    Imagine Dave managing a large datacentre in a remote location selected specifically because of the low cost of real-estate and the prevailing cooler ambient tempreatures helping to reduce the cost of cooling. A modern modular UPS has been installed to provide critical power protection and ensure the availablity of the data for numerous high-profile, house-hold name clients.

    Dave well understood choosing a stadalone type UPS where the main component parts of rectifier, inverter and static switch are modular: i.e. can be easily removed/instered. It meansif there is a problem with say the recitifier, it can be swapped easily. However, if any one of these component did fail then the whole UPS functionality goes down with it.

    So Dave chose a modular system which includes the rectifier and inverter within individual power modules. However, one day the UPS display panel indicated an alarm associated with the single centralised static switch and Dave immediately put out a call to the service provider to attend to investigate. It should only have taken a few moments to swap out but, due to the datacentre’s location getting to the site to replace took the maintance engineer several hours. During that time the system lost its ability to transfer to to static bypass. Dave felt very exposed sitting there looking at the alarm panels and red alarm LED waiting for the engineer to arrive. Having this job is sometimes not the best of times.

    Jim too manages a big data centre in another remote location. Jim understands the concept of decentralised architecture and how it increases system availability. He worked with his trusted advisors at CENTIEL to select a power protection system with the highest level of availability and installed their true modular UPS with DARA.

    With Jim’s UPS all the elements of rectifer, inverter and static switch are contained within each individual module. He knows if a static switch fails in one module then he has not lost the ability to transfer to static bypass via the rest of the modules in the UPS frame.

    One thing that was always at the back of his mind was the communciatons between modules. Surely duplication and redundancy of UPS components must also apply to this aspect of the system design? The most simple communications bus is a single cable. If this breaks or becomes disconnected, the entire system could potentially be compromised. For this reason, the ring circuit was introduced. If the circuit breaks the signals can simply communicate the other way around the ring.

    But Jim being the natural risk averse person that he is, wanted even more assurance and wanted to see how this was being addressed by the designer. CENTIEL’s Triple Mode communications bus was the answer. Like its name suggests, there are three paths of communication between UPS modules, and parallel frames, with three separate ring circuits, and three brains in each module communicating with the three brains in all the the other modules – it’s the belt, braces and buttons approach.

    Jim likes the image of comparing Triple Mode to a tightrope walker. If a tightrope breaks, the consequences will be dramatic and far-reaching. In the same way, a single communications bus is far more precarious than a Triple Mode ring connection which is more like a bridge with multiple supports. Here potential single points of failure are removed. Even if one or several bridge struts fail, the others will support the load.

    While we all understand what the D and R mean in DARA, distributed and redundant through decentralised parallel independent UPS modules with triple communications what does the the A stand for?

    A is the automated democratic decision making process which is another real differentiator in CENTIEL’s 4th generation true modular UPS. The sum of the decision determines the total system action or reaction to any issues.

    In Dave’s UPS system in our first datacentre example, if five modules share a load, if one has a problem it may signal all the modules go to static bypass. With Jim’s system, democratic decision making recognises a fault in one module and the other four will remain online while the problematic module is switched off automatically, allowing for replacement or repair while the load is still protected. No single component takes decisions for the whole system.The automated process removes some of the human element which has led to the majority of datacentre power failures in recent years.

    A static switch in a module goes down. Jim is alerted to the single module fault as his critical facilities continue to be maintained by the other UPS modules. Jim phones the engineer so it can be replaced while he grabs a quick coffee. Having this job is the best of times.

    Conclusion

    Naturally, often cost comes into the decision making process when purchasing a UPS. However, the purpose of a UPS system must be to protect critical loads with the highest level of availability. There must be no potential single points of failure. Therefore, it is important to check the configuration and the definition of a modular system carefully and seek expert advice before purchasing.

    At CENTIEL our design team has been working with data centres for many years at the forefront of technological development. We are the trusted advisors to some of the world’s leading institutions in this field. For this reason, we have developed our pioneering 4th generation true modular UPS system CumulusPower which offers offer industry-leading availability of 99.9999999% (nine, nines), with low total cost of ownership (TCO) through its Maximum Efficiency Management (MEM) and low losses of energy.

    Article originally featured in DCNN November 2018

     

     


  • Saft and Socomec deliver state-of-the-art backup power system for Total’s supercomputer environment

           Innovative hot-swappable uninterruptible power supply (UPS) integrates high-performance Saft lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries

    ·       Electronic management and high reliability enable Total to protect the operations of its High Performance Computer (HPC) data center

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