Exhibitor Press Releases

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  • Two fundamental incentives for using modular UPSs in data centres

    14 Jan 2020 Alex Emms, Operations Director, KUP
    Availability at all levels According to a recently-released Uptime Institute Intelligence report, ‘Annual Data Center Survey Results 2019’, distributed resiliency using active-active data centres is b ...
    • EkkoSoft Critical 6.0 goes beyond traditional capacity reporting to address all aspects of data centre estate performance
    • New EkkoSoft Critical release enables true real-time M&E Capacity Planning for data centre power, cooling and space
  • 5G and its impact on data centres

    14 Jan 2020 Alex Emms, Operations Director, KUP
    Expected 5G impact on data centres The relationship between 5G and the IoT is highlighted by a Gartner survey[i], in which 57% of respondents reported that their main interest in 5G was to drive IoT c ...
  • One Giant Leap

    13 Jan 2020 Louis McGarry

    What do you do when you see a space man?  Park the car man!  I've always loved that joke!   But seriously, what relevance has it got to colocation data centre infrastructure?  

    The fact is that the processing capacity of servers is rapidly increasing.  Ten processors used to do the job that one can now do.  Moor's law states computer processing power doubles every two years.  Yet we also know that the speed at which we create data is growing at an astonishing rate and the situation is only set to escalate. 

    Datacentres are right to respond to anticipated future demand.  However, what also needs to be considered is the equally rapid reduction in IT power consumption.  With real-estate prices at a premium and set to continue to rise, plus the high costs of power consumption and maintenance of an oversized legacy UPS, being wise to maximise the use of existing infrastructures and constantly right-sizing appropriate to the load, can minimise running costs and maximise returns for the colocation datacentre.

    Colocation datacentres are generally assessed by customers on their PUE (Power Usage Effectiveness), level of resilience and the cost of space.  One option to optimise all three elements, is to look at deploying a decentralised infrastructure.  We are currently seeing around half of the colocation datacentres we work with moving in this direction.

    What do you do when you see a space man?  Park the car man!  I've always loved that joke!   But seriously, what relevance has it got to colocation data centre infrastructure?  

    The fact is that the processing capacity of servers is rapidly increasing.  Ten processors used to do the job that one can now do.  Moor's law states computer processing power doubles every two years.  Yet we also know that the speed at which we create data is growing at an astonishing rate and the situation is only set to escalate. 

    Datacentres are right to respond to anticipated future demand.  However, what also needs to be considered is the equally rapid reduction in IT power consumption.  With real-estate prices at a premium and set to continue to rise, plus the high costs of power consumption and maintenance of an oversized legacy UPS, being wise to maximise the use of existing infrastructures and constantly right-sizing appropriate to the load, can minimise running costs and maximise returns for the colocation datacentre.

    Colocation datacentres are generally assessed by customers on their PUE (Power Usage Effectiveness), level of resilience and the cost of space.  One option to optimise all three elements, is to look at deploying a decentralised infrastructure.  We are currently seeing around half of the colocation datacentres we work with moving in this direction.

  • Leading UPS manufacturer, CENTIEL UK, has confirmed the promotion of Louis McGarry to Sales and Marketing Director with immediate effect. Formerly CENTIEL’s sales manager, Louis McGarry will now oversee CENTIEL’s UK sales and marketing operation. In addition, Andrew Skelton previously operations manager, has now been named as Operations Director.   Andrew Skelton is responsible for the delivery and deployment of CENTIEL’s full range of market leading UPS solutions for projects across the UK.

     

    Mike Elms, managing director, CENTIEL UK confirms: “Since launching the CENTIEL brand in the UK two years ago, the company has grown dramatically requiring additional staff which makes introducing the correct structure and the right people within a senior management team imperative. In addition, our range of UPS solutions has been further extended, so as well as CENTIEL’s true modular UPS system, CumulusPower which offers class-leading “9 nines” availability, the standalone PremiumTower range now has individual ratings up to 250kW. As a technology company, we continue to position CENTIEL as industry experts and trusted advisors to our growing client base in the UK.

    “Louis McGarry’s appointment to sales and marketing director recognises his significant contribution to our success so far. He will now have overall responsibility for the continued expansion of our hardware and service sales in the UK.

    Louis and Andrew’s new roles and our renewed structure will further strengthen our existing team and put CENTIEL in the best place for continued for long-term industry leadership.”

    Louis McGarry comments: “I joined CENTIEL to be part of something different. Launching the CENTIEL brand and delivering the latest UPS technology has certainly been different! Being part of a team of experts who have an agile approach and a shared goal has been key the company’s growth and to our success.

    “Taking on the role of sales and marketing director will allow me to continue our expansion and help the company move to the next level. It’s an exciting time in this industry to be leading the next generation of UPS experts, delivering the next generation of UPS technology. Who wouldn’t want to be part of this!”

    Louis McGarry joined CENTIEL at the end of February 2018 as Sales Manager. McGarry has over a decade of experience in the UPS industry working for brands such as Kohler Power (previously UPSL), and Emerson Network Power (Vertiv). 

    His extensive knowledge of products and services including UPS systems and generators enables him to successfully design and deliver solutions for the critical power market.

    CENTIEL is a Swiss-based technology company designing, manufacturing and delivering industry-leading power protection solutions for critical facilities. Its three phase true modular UPS, CumulusPower known for its “9 nines” (99.9999999%) system availability and low total cost of ownership through its Maximum Efficiency Management (MEM) and low losses of energy, has now been installed in datacenters and comms rooms in over 60 countries across five continents. More than 50 MW of critical power loads are now protected with CumulusPower in locations across the world including: the UK, Singapore, Australia, Germany, Spain, the Czech Republic and the Channel Islands.

    Find out more : www.centiel.co.uk

  • Come and meet the DCD award-winning team at this year's DCW London.

  • You may have heard of “diesel bugs” – but do you know just how nasty they become when left to settle and grow? Blocked filters, damaged pumps and equipment failure are all costly side effects of stagnant fuel; an issue common with tanks used infrequently e.g. generator back up tanks.

    Using a recirculation unit as part of your fuel maintenance programme can help prevent this unexpected downtime.

  • When building the Project Q data center in Queretaro, owner representative Santander Global Facilities México faced this challenge: How to route multiple cables and pipes through a 45 cm thick perimeter wall and still maintain its integrity?

  • Cable and pipe seal provider Roxtec has more than doubled its fire resistance testing capacity. The new laboratory creates conditions for continuous development of safety products.

  • NO ORDINARY MODULAR UPS SYSTEM

    05 Dec 2019 Socomec UK

    Global power management expert, Socomec, is driving a stream of innovation to guarantee the performance of the new electrical ecosystem and has developed a disruptive new UPS solution that makes the latest advances in technology more accessible – and easier to deploy – than ever before.

     

     

  • Due to the ever-changing data center environment Roxtec seals were installed on several centers built for a multinational technology company throughout the USA.

  • There are major benefits to an organisation in choosing intelligent Power Distribution Units (PDUs) for installations including the knowledge surrounding the data which is captured. Not only is data d ...
  • Cleveland Cable is proud to have received certificate number SKT-001 of the BASEC stockist scheme, making us the first cable distributor in the world to be accredited under a BASEC scheme. The BASEC mark is recognised by the worldwide cable industry as the mark of reassured quality. 

  • Cleveland Cable Company strive to continually improve quality across all areas of our business. We are proud to announce the completion of our custom built testing centre in our Middlesbrough Head Office and gaining our newest certification, the BSI Kitemark for our internal testing under the scope of:  Electrical and other cables; The process of Batch testing - certificate number KM712695

  • IT service company Tieto transforms a former military installation in a Swedish rock cave into a cutting-edge data center. To enable expansion for new customers and additional equipment, Tieto uses Roxtec cable and pipe seals.

  • Trasf Eco for the datacentre business

    18 Nov 2019 Pierantonio Cantoni

    Trasf Eco is a key partner in one of the biggest and most advanced datacentre project in Europe, developed by one of the top American companies in the cloud services market.

  • Centiel’s Uninterruptible Power Supplies  protect patients at Musgrove Hospital

    Musgrove Park Hospital in Taunton is the home of Somerset Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (SNICU), a specialised ward for the treatment of premature and sick new-born babies within Somerset.

    SNICU is situated in the maternity building of the hospital and divided into two different areas: intensive and special care. There are 18 cots in total.

    Knight Electrical is a specialist contractor in power systems integration, undertaking generator controls and all forms of installation and site modification works.  The company has contracts with various hospitals, manufacturing facilities, schools and government organisations for the design, installation and maintenance of electrical systems.

    In 2018, Knight Electrical was contracted to design and build a UPS plant room to protect all the power for Musgrove Park Hospital’s SNICU unit which looks after babies requiring continuous monitoring of their breathing or heart rate, additional oxygen and tube feeding. The specialist unit also offers short term intensive care and recovery and convalescence from surgery.

    The hospital required a space-saving and cost-effective solution to protect the critical power to this important ward which offered the highest levels of power availability and a 60-minute run time in the event of a power failure.  In addition, the UPS needed to protect the power to the Maternity Theatre as well as future birthing pools.

    Knight Electricals’ design took advantage of a piece of neglected land near the SNICU unit.  However, instead of incurring the significant cost of a new building, Knight Electrical came up with the innovative idea to adapt and convert a 20-foot shipping container into a secure UPS plant room.  This bespoke solution was designed specifically to meet the requirements of the hospital and to overcome the challenges presented to the team.

    Andrew Winiarczyk Knight Electrical Contracts and Engineering Director commented: “We have been designing plant rooms for over 20 years, so are used to providing bespoke solutions for our clients, however, this is the first time that we have used this particular technique. Space was limited and this presented us with a real challenge, the shipping container proved the ideal solution as the entire plant room could fit into one 20-foot container.

    “We modified the shipping container with insulation, boarded it and set it onto sturdy concrete foundations, slightly raised to remove the risk of flooding.  We also looked at a glass reinforced plastic (GRP) building as an alternative but concerns over fire risk and moisture quickly ruled this out.   The area around the unit was gravelled and fenced off and the result was a secure unit ready to house the UPS system to protect the hospital’s SNICU unit’s power.”

    Centiel won the tender to supply 1 x CumulusPower Modular UPS 200kW N+1 with 60 minutes autonomy built into 250kW frame. Centiel supplied its 4thGeneration Modular UPS system: CumulusPower, with 9x 25kW intelligent modules, which allows space for the hospital to add an additional 25kW module in the future if/when the load demand increases.

    CumulusPower is a three-phase, modular UPS which offers 99.9999999% (“9 nines”) system availability achieved through fully independent and self-isolating intelligent UPS modules – each with individual rectifiers, inverters, static bypass, CPU and communications logic and display.

    The Intelligent Module Technology (IMT), with a fault-tolerant parallel Distributed Active Redundant Architecture (DARA), removes single points of failure to offer industry leading availability.  In the unlikely event of a module failure, it can be quickly and safely be “hot-swapped” without transferring the load to bypass and raw mains.

    In addition, CumulusPower has been designed to offer the highest levels of resilience and complete peace of mind.  It can be maintained without the need to bypass to mains powerwhich means there is no risk of interruptions to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. It has also been designed to reduce the total cost of ownership through low losses.  The high double conversion efficiency of >97.1% at the module level means it is currently the best solution available to protect infrastructure as its configuration also reduces downtime risk, avoiding costly errors as well as increasing energy efficiency.

    Stuart Cockburn, sales manager, Centiel UK, explained: “The main challenge with the installation was the compact size of the shipping container.  The UPS weighs only about half a tonne but the amount of batteries needed to support the Hospital’s requirement of a 60-minute run time was significant and weighed around nine tonnes, so took up a fair proportion of the space available.

    “We created a bespoke design for the battery racks optimising the configuration for ease of access and maintenance of both the UPS and batteries.  We maximised use of the floor to ceiling space to create a workable area, ensuring there was enough room to allow for the rest of the equipment including DC isolation, bypass panel, UPS distribution panel and building management service (BMS) which all needed to be accessed readily for maintenance. The shipping container also needed to have room for air conditioning units plus emergency lighting.

    Centiel supports the UPS with a comprehensive maintenance contract which guarantees a response within four hours, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Two preventative maintenance visits a year, 24-hour telephone support, free labour, travelling to site are included for full peace of mind.

    Cockburn concluded: “The installation was completed in June 2019 and it will now protect the power for the patients at the important baby unit at Musgrove Park Hospital for many years to come.” 

    For further information please visit www.centiel.co.uk

  • Day in the Life of a CENTIEL Engineer

    10 Nov 2019 Centiel UK

    As a service and maintenance engineer for leading uninterruptable power supply (UPS) manufacturer CENTIEL, life is never dull! I work with datacentres and organisations with UPS installations all over the UK. This requires liaising with facilities management teams on a daily basis for maintenance visits, site surveys, installations and emergency callouts.

    On a typical day, I will normally have a maintenance call in the diary at some point. This can be for what we call a ‘minor’ maintenance visit or a ‘major’ maintenance visit. A minor maintenance is a visual six-monthly check over of the UPS equipment to make sure it’s all working correctly.  I will also inspect the batteries which provide the back-up power to the UPS unit for signs of wear and tear and do a short battery test on-site.

    For a major maintenance visit, I would complete a full inspection of the kit, including lifting the covers, checking the fans, capacitors, batteries, etc. If all is well, I would complete a switching test or a ‘mains discharge test’. This means I literally turn the power off to mimic a power outage to ensure the UPS switches over to battery power. I monitor the batteries during the discharge and re-charge to ensure they are performing optimally.

    While the UPS is switched off, the site load is supported by the raw mains supply.  Any mains interruptions while the UPS is on bypass, will directly affect the site load. Due to this, some customers prefer their ‘major’ maintenance visit to take place outside of normal working hours.

    However, if their UPS system is set up in an N+1 configuration this redundancy means it is possible to switch the mains power off and remain protected allowing tests to be completed safely.

    These tests allow me to make any necessary recommendations for any replacement parts or batteries. It’s really important to replace batteries before their end of life.   We say ‘it’s better to replace one year early than a day too late’ as one faulty battery will bring down the whole string, which could cause power protection issues and end up being far more costly for the client.

    Next, I’m out on the road again, often supporting our project management team, checking a new site ahead of an installation. Clients and facilities management teams can give us much of the information we need over the phone, but it is important to check access in person too. This is because we are often installing many tonnes of battery equipment and the UPS itself can weigh around half a tonne, so any access issues need to be addressed in advance.

    For a recent pre-installation visit, I discovered a step into the comms room which had not been highlighted. This may seem like a small detail, however, knowing this ahead of the installation allowed me to build a ramp to ensure equipment could be delivered and therefore, avoiding delays during the install.  A different pre-installation visit recently revealed a broken goods lift which was needed to move 16 tonnes of batteries between floors. Identifying this issue ahead of the installation allowed us to work with the client to provide an alternative solution.

    Emergency call outs are the other part of my day.  Such calls can happen at any time and often outside normal working hours! Although we manufacture and maintain CENTIEL’s UPS solutions which are renowned for their industry leading levels availability (9.99999999%) with just milliseconds downtime per year, we also look after third party manufacturers’ UPS systems on maintenance and service contracts too.

    I was recently called to a major financial institution that had experienced a power outage which took out half the building for half a day. Power protection was supplied by a third-party manufacturer’s UPS which had failed due to a downstream power spike taking out some of the components. I needed to create a temporary power feed to get the system up and running again and the order replacement parts for a permanent fix.

    I have to ‘plug’ CENTEIL’s CumulusPower UPS here, which is a ‘truly’ modular system, meaning if one component fails the other modules take over the load so there is no single point of failure and the power remains protected at all times.

    Replacement of the modules takes just a matter of minutes. If a correctly configured CumulusPower had been installed at this particular financial institution, there would have been no downtime or disruption at all. Educating clients about the advantages upgrading to a more reliable and available UPS system which also results in a lower total cost of ownership is just part and parcel of the job!

    For further information please visit www.centiel.co.uk

  • A challenging and high specification 140m2 data hall project delivered on time and in budget

  • AVTECH noted for its wide range of robust and affordable monitors and sensors that help proactively monitor facilities to prevent environment-related downtime and damage

     

  • View From The Top

    03 Nov 2019 Centiel UK

    ER Interviewed Mike Elms, managing director at Centiel UK, sponsors of the Data Centre Design and Build Product of the Year award, to find out his unique insight into the UPS marketplace and why the company chose to sponsor this particular category.

    WHY DID CENTIEL CHOOSE TO SPONSOR THE ER AWARDS IN 2020?

    In 2019, Centiel was shortlisted for three ER Excellence Award categories: Power Project of the Year, Power Product of the Year and Energy Saving Project of the Year, and so we felt it was right to ‘put something back’ by sponsoring the Data Centre Build and Design Product of the Year award in 2020.  Sponsorship offers a great platform for us to join Electrical Review in rewarding excellence, innovation and collaboration.  The ER awards recognise projects that embrace the latest in electrical engineering, display forward-thinking design and implementation and champion the highest environmental, safety and energy efficiency standards which are values very close to our hearts.  As manufacturers and trusted advisors in this sector, we were keen to be involved in rewarding innovation, particularly when it comes to reducing environmental impact wherever possible.  In addition, this year was the first time that Data Centre Review magazine has been involved in the awards and this enabled an expanded range of categories including new awards for products and projects, opening up the floor to the data centre industry.  We are looking forward to networking and making new contacts as well as hearing about and meeting the people behind the projects on the night.

    WHAT MAKES AN OUTSTANDING PRODUCT IN YOUR VIEW?

    Products need to respond to market demands by addressing specific needs and providing measurable benefits to users in a timely manner.  Although as sponsors, we are not involved in judging, those solutions that have been designed with the highest environmental and therefore efficiency considerations in mind will certainly be rewarded.

    WHAT IS CENTIEL’S HISTORY?

    Centiel is a Swiss-based technology company designing, manufacturing and delivering industry-leading power protection solutions for critical facilities. The company’s range of class-leading, energy efficient, UPS systems offers the highest availability and reliability.  Centiel’s network of channel partners and subsidiaries is rapidly expanding, providing class-leading power protection solutions worldwide.  Although a relatively new company, Centiel’s team of designers have experience that covers the last four decades.  We were responsible for the design of the world’s first three-phase transformerless UPS and the world’s first three-phase modular UPS.  Centiel’s three-phase modular UPS solution CumulusPower has now been installed in data centres and comms rooms in over 60 countries across five continents, protecting more than 50 MW of critical power loads in locations including: the UK, Singapore, Australia, Germany, Spain, the Czech Republic and now the Channel Islands.

    WHAT CHANGES WITHIN THE UPS INDUSTRY HAVE YOU SEEN OVER THE LAST FEW YEARS?

    In the 1980s UPS were huge, and relative to today were big, noisy, inefficient machines.  A 60kVA UPS in 1988 weighed 700kg and was the size of a double wardrobe.  Although they were very well engineered, they were at best only 80-85% efficient.  No one talked about the need for energy efficiency back then.  Certainly, the main driver for UPS design over the last 15 years has been efficiency; because of this, static UPS systems have now almost entirely migrated over to transformerless designs which reduce cost, weight, and improve efficiency.  We have now also moved from mainframe to file server, to the cloud and now to edge computing.  The rapid accumulation of data is driving change exponentially.  All information is being logged. Most of it is useless but it needs to be stored somewhere.  This will result in the continued growth in the data centre industry and the need for small edge data centres at our homes and offices in the future, to process and store the less important data while the critical information is sent to the cloud and the mega data centres.

    WHAT ARE THE MAIN CONSIDERATIONS WHEN IT COMES TO PURCHASING A UPS?

    Organisations need to eliminate risks that may cause any potential downtime of business-critical applications.  Availability is the key metric; data centres need to be available constantly, with zero downtime.  Untold financial and reputational damage can result from unplanned downtime and therefore availability continues to be the major concern for data centre managers and those working in critical environments.

    WHY IS AVAILABILITY SO IMPORTANT?

    Data centres need the highest level of availability possible to ensure their customers can depend on access to data at all times.  In other words: systems must be available every second of every day.  The probability that a system is operating, as and when required, is the true definition of availability.  Availability should not be confused with reliability.  Reliability is an important and related factor in power protection design and is termed as: the probability that a system will not fail.  For example: a UPS can be extremely reliable, but when a fault does occur, then the system can fail completely and lose load power or transfer to bypass, leaving the load vulnerable.  A simple power cut could then compromise availability, leaving the data centre without critical power.

    WHAT CHANGES DO YOU ANTICIPATE IN THE MARKET?

    The move away from traditional lead acid battery as the primary energy store for the UPS will be a big change in the future.  Li-ion has a number of benefits including: the ability to run at a higher temperature meaning that in many European locations this means cooling could, in future, be provided by the natural air temperature, if cooling is needed at all.  This would result in significant savings on data centre running costs and reduced carbon footprints.  Li-ion batteries also typically require less than half the physical space of the equivalent lead acid blocks and less than 25% of the weight.  In addition, 10-year design life lead acid batteries are normally replaced every seven or eight years.  With Li-ion this is 13-15 years.

    HOW IS CENTIEL ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES?

    At Centiel we look at everything to reduce environmental impact by improving efficiency.  This comes down to tiny aspects like the length of cables for example and investigating differing types of semiconductor materials to gain the most efficiency from a system.  As award sponsors we will be very interested to learn more about other innovative solutions which share our focus on availability, efficiency and reducing environmental impact.


    For further information please visit www.centiel.co.uk

  • Talk is Cheap

    31 Oct 2019 Centiel UK

    Once upon a time, a consultant could specify a UPS for a project that would ensure the client got what they wanted and that very same equipment would arrive on site, be installed, checked and commissioned successfully, then everyone lived happily ever after. However, in today’s world, costs are being increasingly scrutinised and we are seeing more and more examples of ‘value engineering’ coming into play, sometimes to the detriment of the outcome of the project.

    What I mean by ‘value engineering’ is that the contractor takes on the spec as a design and build, they then have to make a decision on a product which just about meets requirements but doesn’t always adhere to the original spec. This usually happens as a result of trying to control costs.

    The challenge for most projects is that they run over budget, this is often due to the limited information provided at the design stage. This results in one or two ‘guesstimates’ in the spec which is then handed over to the contractor to piece together an installation that will work, for a budget which is usually smaller than what’s really needed.

    There is more than one road to Rome, as they say, and there is always more than one solution which will ‘do the job’.

    Therefore, the spec will usually name several manufacturers who are suitable to provide an ‘equal and approved alternative’. With the inevitable pressure on budgets, the contractor can be forced into selecting the cheapest option, which may end up costing the client more in running costs plus maintenance, repair and replacement later down the line.

    How would it be then, if the ‘equal and approved alternative’ could outperform the spec and still be the most cost-effective way forward? It would be a win-win for client, consultant and contractor alike. To achieve this result requires some joined-up thinking at the planning stage. Why not invite manufacturers into the discussion earlier to pool knowledge resources, ideas and come up with workable options which will save client costs over the long term? Talk is cheap, making mistakes can be costly!

    A typical example would be the requirement for 100kW N+1 to support a critical load. Often, we see two standalone UPS systems of say 2x100kW, however, a better solution could be modular. For example: 6x20kW modules would reduce the overall footprint and downsize the battery requirement from 200KW to 120KW. Further, the six modules would need far less switch gear than the two standalone UPS systems (which would need paralleled switch gear). Although the resilience level is the same at N+1, the speed in which redundancy is regained is more than ten times faster than the traditional approach, improving availability. In this example, a loss of redundancy (+1) in a modular system would be the case of losing 1 x 20kW module. Comparably with the standalone solution, a loss of redundancy means a loss of 100kW of UPS, which could take up to six hours of repair onsite or result in that unit being replaced.

    At CENTIEL we have recently worked on a couple of interesting projects where we were able to offer an alternative solution to solve particular challenges. By working closely with the contractor and consultant we fulfilled the spec in the most cost-effective way possible.

    The first project was for a London client in the financial district, where the spec was for a full 250kW modular UPS frame to support a day two load and resilience level of 200kW N+1. It was identified during the early stages of implementation that the load requirements were actually lower than the anticipated day two spec. We advised supplying 4x50kW modules providing 150kW N+1 to support the actual day one load, reducing the project budget by matching the actual load while leaving the infrastructure for future growth. The day one power requirement was only for four modules, we left the infrastructure in place including a spare bay for an additional module within the UPS frame, the full battery rack and DC isolation unit in place. As the load had increased a year later, we added the fifth module. The architecture of the modular system allowed us to install the fifth module and associated batteries while the system was still live and supporting the load. This enabled the client to reduce the CapEx until required. Right-sizing UPS systems in this way can save considerable expenditure on initial outlay and running costs.

    However, it’s not always about juggling module requirements. The second project was a hospital intensive care installation where space in the UPS plant room was particularly limited. The UPS weighed only about half a tonne, but the amount of batteries needed to support the Hospital’s requirement of a 60-minute run time weighed around nine tonnes, so took up a fair proportion of the space available. We designed bespoke battery racks optimising the configuration for ease of access and maintenance of both the UPS and batteries. We maximised use of the floor to ceiling space to create a workable area, ensuring there was enough room to allow for the rest of the equipment including DC isolation, bypass panel, UPS distribution panel and building management service (BMS) which all needed to be accessed readily by our maintenance engineers.

    The key to the success of these projects was the open and productive discussions between all parties involved to come up with the best long-term solution for the client, in contrast to a ‘just buy the cheapest’ approach. By working together as trusted advisors, we can help solve these common commercial challenges with solutions that can outperform the spec without compromising on performance.

    Remember ‘talk is cheap’ but choosing an unsuitable UPS can work out to be very expensive in the long run!

    For further information please visit www.centiel.co.uk

     

  • When developing the JAEGGI ADC High Density, achieving maximum power density was a key priority. These units are therefore ideal for high-power applications such as the cooling of IT systems.

  • AVTECH Software (AVTECH) is thrilled to announce that Room Alert has been named ”Innovation Product of the Year” by the International Trade Council during their International Go Global Awards ceremony ...

Latest News

  • 07-Jul-2020
    14:52

    User data, secure server, firewall safety, online password protection, cybersecurity, ransomware, GDPR, cyberattacks, phishing, data privacy, license agreement…these are all words that have come to drive us crazy.

    The theme of the online climate is security. Companies, governments, customers and people spend much time, money and effort trying to protect themselves online. But what exactly are we protecting? Our identities, our records, our personal data, social media posts, privacy or is it something more? 

    The post Security in the digital age: How safe do you feel? appeared first on Techerati.

  • 07-Jul-2020
    11:16

    LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM. – JULY 6, 2020 – Schneider Electric, the leader in digital transformation of energy management and automation, today announced that it has been named HPE Momentum Edge Partner of the Year 2020. Schneider Electric is the first company to be recognized by HPE in the newly-added category.

    At the HPE Partner Growth Summit Virtual Experience, Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) announced the winners of the 2020 HPE Partner of the Year Awards. These channel partners from across the partner ecosystem have been awarded for their outstanding performance, commitment to customer excellence, focus on growth and innovation, and professional achievements.

    The post Schneider Electric Named HPE Momentum Edge Partner of the Year 2020 appeared first on Techerati.

  • 07-Jul-2020
    09:08

    TikTok will stop operations in Hong Kong in the wake of a sweeping national security law in the former British colony.

    The short-form video app’s planned departure from Hong Kong comes amid concerns from various social media platforms and messaging apps including Facebook, WhatsApp, Telegram, Google and Twitter over the possibility of providing user data to Hong Kong authorities.

    The post TikTok halts operations in Hong Kong amid security law fears appeared first on Techerati.

Sponsors

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Gold Sponsors

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